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Archive for July, 2013

Roorkhee chair

July 31, 2013 Leave a comment

A small diversion recently was a roorkhee chair in walnut. Lots of walnut in Nebraska. The chair comes apart and has no solid joints, but rather uses tapered tenons. The back is not fixed and conforms to your seating position. This was a prototype. The next one will be taller and use leather for the seating.

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Walnut post and rung chair

July 30, 2013 Leave a comment

I have wanted to learn chair building for several years.  I started out wanting to build Windsor chairs and looked for a mentor within range of good old Nebraska.  Not much luck on that front.  I then moved to post and rung chairs wanting to attend the Country Workshop, but time and money derailed that effort.  So what is a person to do.  I decided if I could not muster the talent to actually build one, I could at least read about chair construction.  I bought Mike Abbott’s Going with the Grain and A Chair Makers Workshop by Drew Langsner.  They were great reads and a constant reference.  So I had the book smarts, and I had the desire, but still had not put the pieces together.  More searching led me to the Boggs collective.  Now I certainly know this site and somewhat covert thy neighbor when I view his gallery.  My creeping on his site led me to understand that Mr. Boggs is not the only chair maker in the collective – enter Stephan James Zbornik.

http://www.boggscollective.com/stephen-james-zbornik/

I will not speak for Stephan other then to say that he happens to live in Iowa (that’s next to Nebraska) for all my more cultured followers.  Diligent detective work and more creeping got me an email and eventually a phone number.  Stephan agreed to spend the day with me going through the chair building process.  What an experience and what a cool dude for allowing a perfectly good stranger into his workshop for the day.  I cannot say enough good things about this gentleman’s skill and class.  I learned a lot that day, but it was overload after about hour 5.  The tolerances he works with are measured in thousands of an inch.  Not something a simple spoon carver appreciates the first time around.  Ok, so if you are still with me, I apologize and will finish up soon.  I needed to put what I now knew into practice.  Of course the measuring of angles during assembly happened about hour 6 and I completely lost that knowledge.

Enter Jennie Alexander and Greenwoodworking.com.  I bought his video again from Country Workshop hoping this would be the final piece of the puzzle.  I watched the video and immediately emailed Jennie offering my appreciation.  I have watched the video at least 10 times, often with the laptop on my workbench.

So what is the point of this post again?  I really wanted to thank Stephan and Jennie as my success is theirs each in there own way.  The second chair is much better then the first, but I am still very pleased with the results.

Here is my first walnut post and rung greenwood chair.

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Categories: Uncategorized

2013 In short

July 27, 2013 Leave a comment

I have neglected this blog yet again.  I have even neglected spoon carving as of late.  Several home projects and a strong desire to learn to build chairs has led me down a path that seems to align with spoon carving and hand tool wood working.  I have finally sync’d my phone and will be posting the chair building process very soon.  But first allow me a couple of posts that are not related.  In early Feb we decided to make over our living room.  While we were at it we broke through our kitchen and added a small bar.  Neither of these changes cost thousands of dollars since we were frugal and the labor was all ours (my wife and I).   Here are a couple of glory shots and then we will get on to chair building.

The living room as an ugly red brick fireplace that we covered in slat.  The bar updated our old kitchen to a move open feel with tons more light.  I only wish we have made that change 10 years ago.

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